DRIP-DROP FEEDING

DRIP-DROP FEEDING

Categories: News From LLLI

We are delighted to co-publish this new video and poster about the drip-drop feeding method.

The video is the first ever drip-drop feeding method video to be available internationally, and is an important tool in our breastfeeding ‘tool-kit’.
The video and poster are intended to help healthcare professionals and organizations working in emergencies and families themselves.
It is also intended to be a useful resource for anyone who wants to move from formula feeding to breastfeeding.

The posters can be downloaded and printed for use in your communities, or shared on social media.

We are in the process of translating the poster and video into multiple languages.

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DRIP-DROP FEEDING VIDEO
COLOR POSTERS TO DOWNLOAD
BLACK AND WHITE POSTERS TO DOWNLOAD
COLOR POSTERS FOR USE ON SOCIAL MEDIA
BLACK AND WHITE POSTERS FOR USE ON SOCIAL MEDIA

DRIP-DROP FEEDING Method FOR MOVING toWARDS BreastfeedING

Watch the video here.

Maybe you didn’t start breastfeeding or stopped earlier than you wanted to: reach out for support in relactation/induced lactation.

Drip-Drop Feeding encourages babies to suckle at the breast. It helps you produce more milk through breast-nipple stimulation and makes moving from bottle to breast easier.

Every drop of breastmilk is precious, protecting your baby against germs that can make them sick. Breastfeeding saves lives, especially during emergencies.

Motivation, determination, perseverance and support are vital.

The breast should be a comforting and nurturing place for baby. Do not force-feed baby.

Express breastmilk, or use breastmilk from a healthy wet nurse, or donor milk from a milk bank. If these options aren’t available to you, use a breastmilk substitute (formula), as the last option. Drip-drop method takes practice, and it helps to have some assistance

DRIP-DROP FEEDING IS AS EASY AS 1-2-3!

In a clean cup, with baby’s milk, have a clean spoon, and clean cloth handy for any dribbles. Relax in skin-to-skin contact, either in laid back or up-right position, with baby positioned “tummy to mummy – nipple to nose”.

Take the spoon with milk and drip so it flows from the top of breast to the nipple. Continue ensuring a gentle constant flow (if flow is slow, baby may get frustrated).

Repeat on other breast for as long as baby wants. Allow baby to breastfeed and spend as much time as possible in skin-to-skin contact, suckling on the breasts. You can cup or spoon feed any remaining milk (see our Cup Feeding resources). Avoid all bottle-feeding.

For breastfeeding, aim for 10-12 times in 24 hours and 20-30 mins per session (the more frequent and longer the duration the better, with sessions at night and frequently swapping sides). If baby isn’t able to breastfeed yet, express with the same frequency. Learning to hand express is an important skill, particularly during emergencies.

It can take days or weeks to produce breastmilk, so it’s important the breastmilk supply is increased before decreasing supplements. Reach out to an LLL Leader, or other Breastfeeding Counsellor, who can support you in relactation/induced lactation, advising when and how much to gradually reduce supplements, and closely monitor baby’s weight.

DRIP-DROP FEEDING VIDEO

Watch the video here.

COLOR POSTERS TO DOWNLOAD

English pdf  
Greek pdf
Italian pdf 
Romanian pdf 
Russian pdf

BLACK AND WHITE POSTERS TO DOWNLOAD

English pdf
Greek pdf 
Italian pdf 
Romanian pdf

COLOR POSTERS FOR USE ON SOCIAL MEDIA

Right click on a desktop, or hold and tap on a mobile device to bring up your options to copy or save the image.

English

Greek
Italian

Romanian

Russian

BLACK AND WHITE POSTERS FOR USE ON SOCIAL MEDIA

Right click on a desktop, or hold and tap on a mobile device to bring up your options to copy or save the image.

English

Greek

Italian

Romanian

By Magdalena Whoolery (PhD Health Studies, BSc Nursing, Dip HE Nursing). May 2020. Special thanks to Ma. Ines Av.Fernandez for mentorship and technical support. Photo credit ©Manuel Duarte Pestana.

Developed and adapted from evidence-based sources: IFE Core Group (2017) Operational Guidance on Infant and Young Child Feeding in Emergencies; World Health Organization (2003) Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding; World Health Organization (1998) Relactation: review of experience and recommendations for practice; World Health Organization (1997) Infant Feeding in Emergencies : a guide for mothers.

Resources endorsed by the following: International Baby Food Action Network (IBFAN, defending breastfeeding), Safely Fed Canada, Breastfeeding Advocacy Australia, La Leche League International (LLLI).