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Search result for: sore nipples

Positioning

During the early weeks skin-to-skin contact helps your baby be connected to his instinctive breastfeeding skills and helps you and baby enjoy breastfeeding.... Read More

Leader’s Handbook

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Engorgement

Brand new baby?  Tight, full breast?  Baby having trouble latching on?  You probably have “first week engorgement.”  And there may be some simple solutions. Mothers have come to see engorgement as the natural follow-up to birth.  But it’s more often a natural follow-up to modern expectations of age-old biology.  In a nutshell, babies and breasts expect a lot more cuddling and nursing than many new mothers expect.... Read More

Thrush

Persistent nipple pain in the early weeks of breastfeeding, or nipple pain that appears after several weeks or months of pain-free nursing, may be caused by thrush, which is a yeast infection of the nipples. Thrush is caused by a yeast fungus, usually Candida albicans. Additional symptoms can include:... Read More

Oversupply

Sometimes a mother may make more milk than her baby needs.  Although this may sound like a good problem to have, too much of any good thing can cause challenges - for baby and mother.... Read More

Color of Milk

Human milk comes in a variety of colors. If you pump your milk you may see lots of variation in color: whereas formula milk always looks the same, the composition and appearance of human milk changes throughout the day, and even throughout a pumping session or feed.... Read More

Mastitis

Having a sore breast can be a painful and alarming experience and can occur when the milk flow in your breast is blocked. Your breast may feel tender, there may or may not be redness or a hard spot or sore lump in your breast. Treat any engorgement promptly to avoid developing blocked ducts or mastitis.Whether you have a sore breast, a blocked duct or a breast infection, the initial care is similar: nurse frequently, rest and apply heat to the tender area.... Read More

Nursing Strikes

If your baby or toddler has been breastfeeding well and suddenly refuses to nurse, it is probably what is called a "nursing strike," rather than a signal that it's time to wean. Nursing strikes can be frightening and upsetting to both you and your baby, but they are almost always temporary.... Read More

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