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Breastfeeding and Galactosemia

Rebecca Scott, New Jersey, USA Rebecca’s second child was born with galactosemia, a rare condition that affects the way the body can process the carbohydrate in breast milk. Rebecca recalls the events that led up to the diagnosis and shares more information about the condition. Please note: This article is a personal story of one mother-baby … Read More

Breastfeeding and Thyroidism

Thyroid disorders impact a woman’s health in a variety of ways. When the thyroid is not functioning correctly, it can impact milk production. There is also connection between thyroid disorders and autoimmune problems. ... Read More

Working and Breastfeeding – Choosing a Child Care Provider

Going back to work and leaving your baby in someone else’s care can be one of the most difficult parts of returning to work. Choosing the right person and right setting takes care. You want to find a setting that will provide the kind of care and attention you would give. You want a setting that respects breastfeeding and your expressed breastmilk.  ... Read More

Working and Breastfeeding

You may choose to continue breastfeeding while working outside the home for many reasons - the best food for your baby, antibodies to protect your baby, great way to reconnect when you return from work, and continuing the special relationship of breastfeeding during your days at home.... Read More

Lyme Disease and Breastfeeding

Mary Francell, Bellingham, Washington, USA Adapted from an original article in e-Blender, the Area Leader Letter for LLL of New York, USA. In the Northern Hemisphere, spring and summer weather brings fun opportunities for families. After being cooped up in the house for the winter, they can go outside to take walks, enjoy picnics in the … Read More

Tattoos and Breastfeeding

Most tattooists will not knowingly tattoo a pregnant or breastfeeding mother. This is for liability reasons on the tattoo artists part, but also to prevent any disease that might affect the growing baby, and to allow the mothers body time to heal.  It is suggested that mothers wait at least until 9-12 months after birth, when the child is no longer dependent solely on breastmilk before getting a tattoo.  Reputable tattoo artists will have a waiver for the client to sign that asks about pregnancy and breastfeeding.... Read More